Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSun, F
dc.contributor.authorGerrard, GE
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, JK
dc.contributor.authorTelford, T
dc.contributor.authorNamini, S
dc.contributor.authorWaller, M
dc.contributor.authorFlux, G
dc.contributor.authorGill, VM
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-15T12:19:38Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.citationClinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)), 2017, 29 (5), pp. 310 - 315
dc.identifier.issn0936-6555
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/1103
dc.identifier.eissn1433-2981
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clon.2017.01.002
dc.description.abstractAims When a fixed activity of radioiodine is given for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), absorbed doses of radioiodine can vary widely and are not usually measured. Leeds Cancer Centre has routinely used a form of lesion-specific dosimetry for radioiodine patients. This study investigated if the results of dosimetry influenced treatment decisions for patients with advanced DTC.Materials and methods Since 2005, patients with regionally advanced/metastatic DTC, who underwent radioiodine treatment together with dosimetry, were included in this study. Patients were excluded if their radioiodine post-treatment scan showed no abnormal uptake. Dosimetry was calculated using images taken 2, 3 and 7 days post-radioiodine. Regions of interest were drawn around lesions that required dosimetry and a time-dose activity curve was created. The total cumulative activity was equal to the area under the curve. Each patient's results were prospectively assessed by their oncologist regarding the usefulness of dosimetry in making management decisions.Results Thirty patients were studied and underwent 102 admissions of radioiodine between them. Dosimetry was carried out during 83 of 102 admissions. An absorbed dose of >20 Gy was taken as significant from dosimetry calculations, following which further radioiodine was considered. In 80% of patients, dosimetry was found to be useful when making treatment decisions. Only on 1/19 admissions did dosimetry calculate a minimum dose above 20 Gy in patients who had a total of four or more admissions for radioiodine. Ten per cent (3/30) had a complete response to radioiodine, both biochemically and radiologically, with a median follow-up of 6.7 months. Thirty-three per cent had a partial response/stable disease to radioiodine. The remainder had progressive disease. The decision to discontinue radioiodine therapy was often based on dosimetry and thyroglobulin results. Dosimetry was very useful for patients with thyroglobulin antibodies.Conclusion Only 10% had a complete response. Therefore, a significant number of patients became refractory to radioiodine during a course of repeat admissions for treatment. Dosimetry (often together with thyroglobulin and anatomical scans) helped to identify these patients to avoid further futile radioiodine therapy.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent310 - 315
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectThyroid Neoplasms
dc.subjectIodine Radioisotopes
dc.subjectRadionuclide Imaging
dc.subjectTreatment Outcome
dc.subjectProspective Studies
dc.subjectRadiometry
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom
dc.titleTen Year Experience of Radioiodine Dosimetry: is it Useful in the Management of Metastatic Differentiated Thyroid Cancer?
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-01-03
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.clon.2017.01.002
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-05
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfClinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))
pubs.issue5
pubs.notesNo embargo
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Radioisotope Physics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Radioisotope Physics/Radioisotope Physics (hon.)
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Radioisotope Physics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Radioisotope Physics/Radioisotope Physics (hon.)
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume29
pubs.embargo.termsNo embargo
icr.researchteamRadioisotope Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorFlux, Glennen
dc.contributor.icrauthorMarsden,en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record