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dc.contributor.authorFarland, LV
dc.contributor.authorMu, F
dc.contributor.authorEliassen, AH
dc.contributor.authorHankinson, SE
dc.contributor.authorTworoger, SS
dc.contributor.authorBarbieri, RL
dc.contributor.authorDowsett, M
dc.contributor.authorPollak, MN
dc.contributor.authorMissmer, SA
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-15T15:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.citationCancer causes & control : CCC, 2017, 28 (12), pp. 1441 - 1452
dc.identifier.issn0957-5243
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/1133
dc.identifier.eissn1573-7225
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10552-017-0971-2
dc.description.abstractMenstrual cycle characteristics are markers of endocrine milieu. However, associations between age at menarche and adulthood sex steroid hormone levels have been inconsistent, and data on menstrual characteristics and non-sex steroid hormones are sparse.We assessed the relations of menstrual characteristics with premenopausal plasma sex steroid hormones, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), prolactin, and growth factors among 2,745 premenopausal women (age 32-52) from the Nurses' Health Study II. Geometric means and tests for trend were calculated using multivariable general linear models.Early age at menarche was associated with higher premenopausal early-follicular free estradiol (percent difference < 12 vs. > 13 years = 11%), early-follicular estrone (7%), luteal estrone (7%), and free testosterone (8%) (all p trend < 0.05). Short menstrual cycle length at age 18-22 was associated with higher early-follicular total (< 26 vs. > 39 days = 18%) and free estradiol (16%), early-follicular estrone (9%), SHBG (7%), lower luteal free estradiol (- 14%), total (- 6%), and free testosterone (- 15%) (all p trend < 0.05). Short adult menstrual length was associated with higher early-follicular total estradiol (< 26 vs. > 31 days = 14%), SHBG (10%), lower luteal estrone (- 8%), progesterone (- 9%), total (- 11%) and free testosterone (- 25%), and androstenedione (- 14%) (all p trend < 0.05). Irregularity of menses at 18-22 was associated with lower early-follicular total (irregular vs. very regular = - 14%) and free estradiol (- 14%), and early-follicular estrone (- 8%) (All p trend < 0.05). Irregularity of adult menstrual cycle was associated with lower luteal total estradiol (irregular vs. very regular = - 8%), SHBG (- 3%), higher total (8%), and free testosterone (11%) (all p trend < 0.05).Early-life and adulthood menstrual characteristics are moderately associated with mid-to-late reproductive year's hormone concentrations. These relations of menstrual characteristics with endogenous hormone levels could partially account for associations between menstrual characteristics and reproductive cancers or other chronic diseases.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent1441 - 1452
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectGonadal Steroid Hormones
dc.subjectProlactin
dc.subjectHuman Growth Hormone
dc.subjectInsulin-Like Growth Factor I
dc.subjectSex Hormone-Binding Globulin
dc.subjectInsulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3
dc.subjectMenstrual Cycle
dc.subjectPremenopause
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.titleMenstrual cycle characteristics and steroid hormone, prolactin, and growth factor levels in premenopausal women.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-14
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s10552-017-0971-2
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfCancer causes & control : CCC
pubs.issue12
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research/Endocrinology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology/Endocrinology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology/Endocrinology/Endocrinology (hon.)
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research/Endocrinology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology/Endocrinology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology/Endocrinology/Endocrinology (hon.)
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume28
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamEndocrinologyen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorDowsett, Mitchen
dc.contributor.icrauthorMarsden,en


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