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dc.contributor.authorNg-Cheng-Hin, B
dc.contributor.authorNutting, C
dc.contributor.authorNewbold, K
dc.contributor.authorBhide, S
dc.contributor.authorMcQuaid, D
dc.contributor.authorDunlop, A
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, K
dc.contributor.authorWong, KH
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-23T09:41:16Z
dc.date.available2021-03-23T09:41:16Z
dc.identifier.citationThe British journal of radiology, 2020, 93 (1111), pp. 20200023 - ?
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/4424
dc.identifier.eissn1748-880X
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/bjr.20200023
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE:This study investigates the impact of a restricted craniocaudal (CC) field length of <20 cm on the selection of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients who can be treated on the MR-Linac using a single isocentre technique. We also assess the effects of anthropometric factors and the neck position on the CC field length. METHODS:110 HNC patients who underwent radical primary or adjuvant radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. We assessed the proportion of treatment fields with a CC length of <20 cm and the effects of gender, height, hyo-sternal neck length (distance from superior surface of hyoid to sternal notch measured on the coronal reconstruction of the planning CT) and neck position on CC length. RESULTS:95% of HNC patients had a CC field length <20 cm. Female patients showed a significantly shorter median CC length than male patients in both extended (p = 0.0003) and neutral (p = 0.008) neck positions. Neck position influenced the median CC length with neutral neck being significantly shorter than extended neck (p = 0.0119). Patient height and hyo-sternal neck length showed positive correlation with the CC length, with neck length in neutral position having the strongest correlation (r = 0.65, p = 0.0001 and r = 0.63, p < 0.0001, respectively for extended neck; r = 0.55, p = 0.0070 and r = 0.80, p < 0.0001, respectively for neutral neck). A hyo-sternal neck length of <14.6 cm predicted a CC length of <20 cm in neutral neck position. CONCLUSION:The majority of patients with HNC at the Royal Marsden Hospital have anthropometric features compatible with their being treated on the MR-Linac using a single isocentre technique. The absolute CC field size may vary according to primary tumour site, patient factors and neck position. A hyo-sternal neck length cut-off of 14.6 cm in the neutral neck position can be used as a surrogate marker for suitability of treatment on MR-Linac. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE:This paper highlights the potential impact of a restricted CC field in HNC patient selection for the MR-Linac treatment. This is the first report to suggest the use of neck length as a surrogate marker for suitability of treatment on the MR-Linac.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent20200023 - ?
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHead and Neck Neoplasms
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectAnthropometry
dc.subjectBody Height
dc.subjectRadiotherapy, Adjuvant
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectSex Factors
dc.subjectPatient Selection
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectRadiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated
dc.subjectPatient Positioning
dc.titleThe impact of restricted length of treatment field and anthropometric factors on selection of head and neck cancer patients for treatment on the MR-Linac.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-04
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1259/bjr.20200023
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfThe British journal of radiology
pubs.issue1111
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology/Targeted Therapy
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Targeted Therapy
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology/Targeted Therapy
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Targeted Therapy
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume93
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamTargeted Therapy
icr.researchteamTargeted Therapyen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorNg Cheng Hin, Brianen
dc.contributor.icrauthorHarrington, Kevinen


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