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dc.contributor.authorPloos van Amstel, FK
dc.contributor.authorTol, J
dc.contributor.authorSessink, KH
dc.contributor.authorvan der Graaf, WTA
dc.contributor.authorPrins, JB
dc.contributor.authorOttevanger, PB
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-19T15:00:30Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.citationCancer nursing, 2017, 40 (3), pp. E35 - E40
dc.identifier.issn0162-220X
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/339
dc.identifier.eissn1538-9804
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/ncc.0000000000000380
dc.description.abstractBackground High levels of distress are expected shortly after the diagnosis breast cancer. The Distress Thermometer (DT) is commonly used to screen for distress, using a cutoff score of 4 or 5; however, this score might not be appropriate for detecting distress in women with recently diagnosed breast cancer.Objectives The aims of this study were to establish the optimal DT cutoff score for detecting high distress shortly after breast cancer diagnosis and to correlate this score with the reported problems.Methods We selected for this study Dutch women who completed the DT and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale within 1 month after breast cancer diagnosis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of DT scores was performed, with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale being used as the criterion standard for the level of distress. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of each DT score were calculated.Results In total, 181 women participated in the study. The optimal DT cutoff score for detecting distress was 7 with a sensitivity of 0.73, specificity of 0.84, positive predictive value of 69%, and negative predictive value of 87%. Emotional problems were the most frequently reported concerns.Conclusion We consider a cutoff score of 7, shortly after breast cancer is diagnosed, optimal to identify those women with high distress and therefore at risk of chronic distress.Implications for practice The findings are clinically important because they can enable healthcare professionals to direct their time and resources to those most in need of their assistance.
dc.formatPrint
dc.format.extentE35 - E40
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBreast Neoplasms
dc.subjectMass Screening
dc.subjectSensitivity and Specificity
dc.subjectStress, Psychological
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectNetherlands
dc.subjectFemale
dc.titleA Specific Distress Cutoff Score Shortly After Breast Cancer Diagnosis.
dc.typeJournal Article
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1097/ncc.0000000000000380
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-05
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfCancer nursing
pubs.issue3
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies/Clinical and Translational Sarcoma
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies/Clinical and Translational Sarcoma
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume40
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamClinical and Translational Sarcomaen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorvan der Graaf, Wilhelminaen
dc.contributor.icrauthorMarsden,en


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