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dc.contributor.authorHsieh, JJen_US
dc.contributor.authorPurdue, MPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSignoretti, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwanton, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlbiges, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmidinger, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHeng, DYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorFicarra, Ven_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T16:38:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-09en_US
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28276433en_US
dc.identifiernrdp20179en_US
dc.identifier.citationNat Rev Dis Primers, 2017, 3 pp. 17009 - ?en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/600
dc.identifier.eissn2056-676Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nrdp.2017.9en_US
dc.description.abstractRenal cell carcinoma (RCC) denotes cancer originated from the renal epithelium and accounts for >90% of cancers in the kidney. The disease encompasses >10 histological and molecular subtypes, of which clear cell RCC (ccRCC) is most common and accounts for most cancer-related deaths. Although somatic VHL mutations have been described for some time, more-recent cancer genomic studies have identified mutations in epigenetic regulatory genes and demonstrated marked intra-tumour heterogeneity, which could have prognostic, predictive and therapeutic relevance. Localized RCC can be successfully managed with surgery, whereas metastatic RCC is refractory to conventional chemotherapy. However, over the past decade, marked advances in the treatment of metastatic RCC have been made, with targeted agents including sorafenib, sunitinib, bevacizumab, pazopanib and axitinib, which inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR), and everolimus and temsirolimus, which inhibit mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), being approved. Since 2015, agents with additional targets aside from VEGFR have been approved, such as cabozantinib and lenvatinib; immunotherapies, such as nivolumab, have also been added to the armamentarium for metastatic RCC. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of RCC, with a focus on ccRCC, as well as updates to complement the current clinical guidelines and an outline of potential future directions for RCC research and therapy.en_US
dc.format.extent17009 - ?en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
dc.titleRenal cell carcinoma.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/nrdp.2017.9en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-09en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfNat Rev Dis Primersen_US
pubs.notes6 monthsen_US
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies/Melanoma and Kidney Cancer
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies/Melanoma and Kidney Cancer/Melanoma and Kidney Cancer (hon.)
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
pubs.volume3en_US
pubs.embargo.terms6 monthsen_US
icr.researchteamMelanoma and Kidney Canceren_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorLarkin, Jamesen_US


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