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dc.contributor.authorShaw, CJ
dc.contributor.authorCivale, J
dc.contributor.authorBotting, KJ
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Y
dc.contributor.authorTer Haar, G
dc.contributor.authorRivens, I
dc.contributor.authorGiussani, DA
dc.contributor.authorLees, CC
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:03:23Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.identifier.citationScience translational medicine, 2016, 8 (347), pp. 347ra95 - ?
dc.identifier.issn1946-6234
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/1041
dc.identifier.eissn1946-6242
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/scitranslmed.aaf2135
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the efficacy, maternofetal responses, and safety of using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive occlusion of placental vasculature compared to sham treatment in anesthetized pregnant sheep. This technique for noninvasive occlusion of placental vasculature may be translatable to the treatment of conditions arising from abnormal placental vasculature, such as twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). Eleven pregnant sheep were instrumented with maternal and fetal arterial catheters and time-transit flow probes to monitor cardiovascular, acid-base, and metabolic status, and then exposed to HIFU (n = 5) or sham (n = 6) ablation of placental vasculature through the exposed uterine surface. Placental vascular flow was occluded in 28 of 30 targets, and histological examination confirmed occlusion in 24 of 30 targets. In both HIFU and sham exposures, uterine contact reduced maternal uterine artery flow, but delivery of oxygen and glucose to the fetal brain remained normal. HIFU can consistently occlude in vivo placental vessels and ablate blood flow in a pregnant sheep model. Cardiovascular and metabolic fetal responses suggest that the technique is safe in the short term and potentially translatable to human pregnancy.
dc.formatPrint
dc.format.extent347ra95 - ?
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectFetus
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectSheep
dc.subjectFetofetal Transfusion
dc.subjectOxygen
dc.subjectGlucose
dc.subjectPregnancy
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHigh-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation
dc.titleNoninvasive high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of twin-twin transfusion syndrome: A preliminary in vivo study.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-06-13
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1126/scitranslmed.aaf2135
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-07
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfScience translational medicine
pubs.issue347
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Imaging for Radiotherapy Adaptation
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Therapeutic Ultrasound
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Imaging for Radiotherapy Adaptation
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Therapeutic Ultrasound
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume8
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamImaging for Radiotherapy Adaptationen_US
icr.researchteamTherapeutic Ultrasounden_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorRivens, Ianen
dc.contributor.icrauthorCivale, Johnen
dc.contributor.icrauthorTer Haar, Gailen


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