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dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, RL
dc.contributor.authorKhabra, K
dc.contributor.authorBamber, JC
dc.contributor.authordeSouza, N
dc.contributor.authorMeybodi, F
dc.contributor.authorBarry, PA
dc.contributor.authorRusby, JE
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-16T08:41:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.citationBreast cancer research and treatment, 2018, 171 (2), pp. 391 - 398
dc.identifier.issn0167-6806
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/2067
dc.identifier.eissn1573-7217
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10549-018-4843-6
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE:Three-dimensional surface imaging (3D-SI) of the breasts enables the measurement of breast volume and shape symmetry. If these measurements were sufficiently accurate and repeatable, they could be used in planning oncological breast surgery and as an objective measure of aesthetic outcome. The aim of this study was to validate the measurements of breast volume and symmetry provided by the Vectra XT imaging system. METHODS:To validate measurements, breast phantom models of true volume between 100 and 1000 cm3 were constructed and varying amounts removed to mimic breast tissue 'resections'. The volumes of the phantoms were measured using 3D-SI by two observers and compared to a gold standard. For intra-observer repeatability and inter-observer reproducibility in vivo, 16 patients who had undergone oncological breast surgery had breast volume and symmetry measured three times by two observers. RESULTS:A mean relative difference of 2.17 and 2.28% for observer 1 and 2 respectively was seen in the phantom measurements compared to the gold standard (n = 45, Bland Altman agreement). Intra-observer variation over ten repeated measurements demonstrated mean coefficients of variation (CV) of 0.58 and 0.49%, respectively. The inter-observer variation demonstrated a mean relative difference of 0.11% between the two observers. In patients, intra-observer variation over three repeated volume measurements for each observer was 3.9 and 3.8% (mean CV); the mean relative difference between observers was 5.78%. For three repeated shape symmetry measurements using RMS projection difference between the two breasts, the intra-observer variations were 8 and 14% (mean CV), the mean relative difference between observers was 0.43 mm for average symmetry values that ranged from about 3.5 to 15.5 mm. CONCLUSION:This first validation of breast volume and shape symmetry measurements using the Vectra XT 3D-SI system suggests that these measurements have the potential to assist in pre-operative planning and also as a measure of aesthetic outcome.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent391 - 398
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectMammary Glands, Human
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBreast Neoplasms
dc.subjectObserver Variation
dc.subjectImaging, Three-Dimensional
dc.subjectOrgan Size
dc.subjectMammaplasty
dc.subjectPostoperative Care
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectPhantoms, Imaging
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.titleValidation of the Vectra XT three-dimensional imaging system for measuring breast volume and symmetry following oncological reconstruction.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-05-29
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s10549-018-4843-6
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-09
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfBreast cancer research and treatment
pubs.issue2
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Magnetic Resonance
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Ultrasound & Optical Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Magnetic Resonance
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Ultrasound & Optical Imaging
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume171en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
pubs.oa-locationhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-018-4843-6
icr.researchteamMagnetic Resonanceen_US
icr.researchteamUltrasound & Optical Imagingen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorBamber, Jeffreyen
dc.contributor.icrauthordeSouza, Nanditaen
dc.contributor.icrauthorRusby, Jenniferen


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