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dc.contributor.authorLittle, RA
dc.contributor.authorJamin, Y
dc.contributor.authorBoult, JKR
dc.contributor.authorNaish, JH
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Y
dc.contributor.authorCheung, S
dc.contributor.authorHolliday, KF
dc.contributor.authorLu, H
dc.contributor.authorMcHugh, DJ
dc.contributor.authorIrlam, J
dc.contributor.authorWest, CML
dc.contributor.authorBetts, GN
dc.contributor.authorAshton, G
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, AR
dc.contributor.authorMaddineni, S
dc.contributor.authorClarke, NW
dc.contributor.authorParker, GJM
dc.contributor.authorWaterton, JC
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, SP
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, JPB
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-10T08:38:27Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.citationRadiology, 2018, 288 (3), pp. 739 - 747
dc.identifier.issn0033-8419
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/2596
dc.identifier.eissn1527-1315
dc.identifier.doi10.1148/radiol.2018171531
dc.description.abstractPurpose To cross-validate T1-weighted oxygen-enhanced (OE) MRI measurements of tumor hypoxia with intrinsic susceptibility MRI measurements and to demonstrate the feasibility of translation of the technique for patients. Materials and Methods Preclinical studies in nine 786-0-R renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenografts and prospective clinical studies in eight patients with RCC were performed. Longitudinal relaxation rate changes (∆R1) after 100% oxygen inhalation were quantified, reflecting the paramagnetic effect on tissue protons because of the presence of molecular oxygen. Native transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and oxygen-induced R2* change (∆R2*) were measured, reflecting presence of deoxygenated hemoglobin molecules. Median and voxel-wise values of ∆R1 were compared with values of R2* and ∆R2*. Tumor regions with dynamic contrast agent-enhanced MRI perfusion, refractory to signal change at OE MRI (referred to as perfused Oxy-R), were distinguished from perfused oxygen-enhancing (perfused Oxy-E) and nonperfused regions. R2* and ∆R2* values in each tumor subregion were compared by using one-way analysis of variance. Results Tumor-wise and voxel-wise ∆R1 and ∆R2* comparisons did not show correlative relationships. In xenografts, parcellation analysis revealed that perfused Oxy-R regions had faster native R2* (102.4 sec -1 vs 81.7 sec -1 ) and greater negative ∆R2* (-22.9 sec -1 vs -5.4 sec -1 ), compared with perfused Oxy-E and nonperfused subregions (all P < .001), respectively. Similar findings were present in human tumors (P < .001). Further, perfused Oxy-R helped identify tumor hypoxia, measured at pathologic analysis, in both xenografts (P = .002) and human tumors (P = .003). Conclusion Intrinsic susceptibility biomarkers provide cross validation of the OE MRI biomarker perfused Oxy-R. Consistent relationship to pathologic analyses was found in xenografts and human tumors, demonstrating biomarker translation. Published under a CC BY 4.0 license. Online supplemental material is available for this article.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent739 - 747
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectKidney
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMice
dc.subjectCarcinoma, Renal Cell
dc.subjectKidney Neoplasms
dc.subjectDisease Models, Animal
dc.subjectOxygen
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectImage Enhancement
dc.subjectProspective Studies
dc.subjectFeasibility Studies
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectBiomarkers
dc.subjectHypoxia
dc.titleMapping Hypoxia in Renal Carcinoma with Oxygen-enhanced MRI: Comparison with Intrinsic Susceptibility MRI and Pathology.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-12-21
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1148/radiol.2018171531
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-09
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfRadiology
pubs.issue3
pubs.notesNo embargo
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Pre-Clinical MRI
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Quantitative Biomedical Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Pre-Clinical MRI
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Quantitative Biomedical Imaging
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume288
pubs.embargo.termsNo embargo
pubs.oa-locationhttps://pubs.rsna.org/doi/pdf/10.1148/radiol.2018171531
icr.researchteamPre-Clinical MRIen_US
icr.researchteamQuantitative Biomedical Imagingen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorJamin, Yannen
dc.contributor.icrauthorBoult, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.icrauthorO'Connor, James Patricken


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