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dc.contributor.authorMouratidis, PXEen_US
dc.contributor.authorRivens, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorCivale, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSymonds-Tayler, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorTer Haar, Gen_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T16:02:13Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30700171en_US
dc.identifier.citationInt J Hyperthermia, 2019, 36 (1), pp. 229 - 243en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/3053
dc.identifier.eissn1464-5157en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02656736.2018.1558289en_US
dc.description.abstractAIM: Thermal isoeffective dose (TID) has not been convincingly validated for application to predict biological effects from rapid thermal ablation (e.g., using >55 °C). This study compares the classical method of quantifying TID (derived from hyperthermia data) with a temperature-adjusted method based on the Arrhenius model for predicting cell survival in vitro, after either 'rapid' ablative or 'slow' hyperthermic exposures. METHODS: MTT assay viability data was obtained from two human colon cancer cell lines, (HCT116, HT29), subjected to a range of TIDs (120-720 CEM43) using a thermal cycler for hyperthermic (>2 minutes, <50 °C) treatments, or a novel pre-heated water bath based technique for ablative exposures (<10 seconds, >55 °C). TID was initially estimated using a constant RCEM>43°C=0.5, and subsequently using RCEM(T), derived from temperature dependent cell survival (injury rate) Arrhenius analysis. RESULTS: 'Slow' and 'rapid' exposures resulted in cell survival and significant regrowth (both cell lines) 10 days post-treatment for 240 CEM43 (RCEM>43°C=0.5), while 340-550 CEM43 (RCEM>43°C =0.5) delivered using 'rapid' exposures showed 12 ± 6% viability and 'slow' exposures resulted in undetectable viability. Arrhenius analysis of experimental data (activation energy ΔE = 5.78 ± 0.04 × 105 J mole-1, frequency factor A = 3.27 ± 11 × 1091 sec-1) yielded RCEM=0.42 * e0.0041*T which better-predicted cell survival than using R CEM> 43°C=0.5. CONCLUSIONS: TID calculated using an RCEM(T) informed by Arrhenius kinetic parameters provided a more consistent, heating strategy independent, predictor of cell viability, improving dosimetry of ablative thermal exposures. Cell viability was only undetectable above 305 ± 10 CEM43 using this revised measure.en_US
dc.format.extent229 - 243en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectArrheniusen_US
dc.subjectThermal doseen_US
dc.subjectheaten_US
dc.subjecthyperthermiaen_US
dc.subjectthermal ablationen_US
dc.title'Relationship between thermal dose and cell death for "rapid" ablative and "slow" hyperthermic heating'.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/02656736.2018.1558289en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfInt J Hyperthermiaen_US
pubs.issue1en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Imaging for Radiotherapy Adaptation
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Therapeutic Ultrasound
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume36en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNot knownen_US
icr.researchteamImaging for Radiotherapy Adaptationen_US
icr.researchteamTherapeutic Ultrasounden_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorCivale, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorRivens, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorTer Haar, Gailen_US


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