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dc.contributor.authorSzychot, E
dc.contributor.authorSeunarine, KK
dc.contributor.authorRobles, CA
dc.contributor.authorMandeville, H
dc.contributor.authorMankad, K
dc.contributor.authorClark, C
dc.contributor.authorPeregud-Pogorzelski, J
dc.contributor.authorDesouza, N
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-21T11:12:29Z
dc.date.issued2020-03
dc.identifier.citationAdvances in clinical and experimental medicine : official organ Wroclaw Medical University, 2020, 29 (3), pp. 331 - 337
dc.identifier.issn1899-5276
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/3620
dc.identifier.doi10.17219/acem/114827
dc.description.abstractBackground More than half of pediatric tumors of central nervous system (CNS) primarily originate in the posterior fossa and are conventionally treated with radiation therapy (RT).Objectives The objective of this study was to establish whether corpus callosum volumes (CCV) and whole brain volumes (WBV) are correlated and to determine the impact of whole-brain lowvs high-dose RT on brain parenchymal volume loss as assessed using each technique.Material and methods Of the 30 identified children (6-12 years) with newly diagnosed posterior fossa tumors treated with cranial RT, including focal and whole-brain RT, suitable imaging was obtained for 23. Radiotherapy regimens were the following: no whole-brain RT (Group 1, n = 7), low-dose whole-brain RT (<30 Gy, Group 2, n = 9) and high-dose whole-brain RT (>30 Gy, Group 3, n = 7) in addition to focal boost. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were analyzed at baseline and follow-up (median 14 months). The CCVs were manually segmented on midline sagittal slice (n = 23), while WBVs were segmented semi-automatically using Freesurfer (n = 15). This was done twice (6-month interval) for all baseline CCV measurements and 5 randomly selected WBV measurements to establish measurement reproducibility. Correlations between CCV and WBV were investigated and percentage of children demonstrating reduction in CCV or WBV noted.Results Correlation between baseline CCV and WBV was not significant (p = 0.37). Measurement reproducibility was from 6% to -9% for CCV and from 4.8% to -1.2% for WBV. Among the children studied, 30.4% (7/23) had >9% reduction in CCV at follow-up, while 33.3% (5/15) had >1.2% reduction in WBV. Five of 7 patients with CCV loss were not picked up by WBV measurements. Similarly, 3 of 5 patients with WBV loss were not picked up by CCV measurements.Conclusions The CCV and the WBV are unrelated and may indicate different brain parenchymal losses following RT. Up to a third of posterior fossa tumors treated with RT have measurable CCV or WBV loss; incidence was equivalent in lowvs high-dose whole-brain RT.
dc.formatPrint
dc.format.extent331 - 337
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectCorpus Callosum
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBrain Neoplasms
dc.subjectInfratentorial Neoplasms
dc.subjectOrgan Size
dc.subjectRadiotherapy
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectChild
dc.titleEstimating brain volume loss after radiation therapy in children treated for posterior fossa tumors (Corpus callosum and whole brain volume changes following radiotherapy in children).
dc.typeJournal Article
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.17219/acem/114827
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-03
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfAdvances in clinical and experimental medicine : official organ Wroclaw Medical University
pubs.issue3
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Magnetic Resonance
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Paediatric and Adolescent Radiotherapy
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Magnetic Resonance
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Paediatric and Adolescent Radiotherapy
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume29
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamMagnetic Resonanceen_US
icr.researchteamPaediatric and Adolescent Radiotherapyen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthordeSouza, Nanditaen
dc.contributor.icrauthorMandeville, Henryen


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