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dc.contributor.authorTrevisani, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorGhidini, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLarcher, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLampis, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLote, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorManunta, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlibrandi, MTSen_US
dc.contributor.authorZagato, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCitterio, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorDell'Antonio, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarenzi, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorCapasso, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorRugge, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorRigotti, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorBertini, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorCascione, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorBriganti, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSalonia, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorBenigni, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorBraconi, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorFassan, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHahne, JCen_US
dc.contributor.authorMontorsi, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorValeri, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-03T09:40:44Z
dc.date.issued2016-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish journal of cancer, 2016, 115 (11), pp. 1343 - 1350en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/541
dc.identifier.eissn1532-1827en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/bjc.2016.329en_US
dc.description.abstract<h4>Background</h4>A significant proportion of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy (RN) for clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) develop chronic kidney disease (CKD) within a few years following surgery. Chronic kidney disease has important health, social and economic impact and no predictive biomarkers are currently available. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs implicated in several pathological processes.<h4>Methods</h4>Primary objective of our study was to define miRs whose deregulation is predictive of CKD in patients treated with RN. Ribonucleic acid from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded renal parenchyma (cortex and medulla isolated separately) situated >3 cm from the matching RCC was tested for miR expression using nCounter NanoString technology in 71 consecutive patients treated with RN for RCC. Validation was performed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridisation. End point was post-RN CKD measured 12 months post-operatively. Multivariable logistic regression and decision curve analysis were used to test the statistical and clinical impact of predictors of CKD.<h4>Results</h4>The overexpression of miR-193b-3p was associated with high risk of developing CKD in patients undergoing RN for RCC and emerged as an independent predictor of CKD. The addition of miR-193b-3p to a predictive model based on clinical variables (including sex and estimated glomerular filtration rate) increased the sensitivity of the predictive model from 81 to 88%. In situ hybridisation showed that miR-193b-3p overexpression was associated with tubule-interstitial inflammation and fibrosis in patients with no clinical or biochemical evidence of pre-RN nephropathy.<h4>Conclusions</h4>miR-193b-3p might represent a useful biomarker to tailor and implement surveillance strategies for patients at high risk of developing CKD following RN.en_US
dc.formatPrint-Electronicen_US
dc.format.extent1343 - 1350en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectCarcinoma, Renal Cellen_US
dc.subjectKidney Neoplasmsen_US
dc.subjectMicroRNAsen_US
dc.subjectGlomerular Filtration Rateen_US
dc.subjectNephrectomyen_US
dc.subjectBiomarkers, Tumoren_US
dc.titleMicroRNA 193b-3p as a predictive biomarker of chronic kidney disease in patients undergoing radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-09-22en_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/bjc.2016.329en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfBritish journal of canceren_US
pubs.issue11en_US
pubs.notesNo embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Therapeutics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Therapeutics/Signal Transduction & Molecular Pharmacology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology/Evolutionary Genomics & Modelling
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Molecular Pathology/Gastrointestinal Cancer Biology and Genomics
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume115en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNo embargoen_US
icr.researchteamSignal Transduction & Molecular Pharmacologyen_US
icr.researchteamEvolutionary Genomics & Modellingen_US
icr.researchteamGastrointestinal Cancer Biology and Genomicsen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorHahne, Jensen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorLote, Hazelen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorBraconi, Chiaraen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorValeri, Nicolaen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorLampis, Andreaen_US


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