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dc.contributor.authorCoutts, LV
dc.contributor.authorMiller, NR
dc.contributor.authorMortimer, PS
dc.contributor.authorBamber, JC
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-08T14:50:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of biomechanics, 2016, 49 (1), pp. 94 - 99
dc.identifier.issn0021-9290
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/821
dc.identifier.eissn1873-2380
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.11.043
dc.description.abstractThere is a limited range of suitable measurement techniques for detecting and assessing breast cancer related lymphoedema (BCRL). This study investigated the suitability of using skin stiffness measurements, with a particular focus on the variation in stiffness with measurement direction (known as anisotropy). In addition to comparing affected tissue with the unaffected tissue on the corresponding site on the opposite limb, volunteers without BCRL were tested to establish the normal variability in stiffness anisotropy between these two corresponding regions of skin on each opposite limb. Multi-directional stiffness was measured with an Extensometer, within the higher stiffness region that skin typically displays at high applied strains, using a previously established protocol developed by the authors. Healthy volunteers showed no significant difference in anisotropy between regions of skin on opposite limbs (mean decrease of 4.7 +/-2.5% between non-dominant and dominant arms), whereas BCRL sufferers showed a significant difference between limbs (mean decrease of 51.0+/-16.3% between unaffected and affected arms). A large difference in anisotropy was apparent even for those with recent onset of the condition, indicating that the technique may have potential to be useful for early detection. This difference also appeared to increase with duration since onset. Therefore, measurement of stiffness anisotropy has potential value for the clinical assessment and diagnosis of skin conditions such as BCRL. The promising results justify a larger study with a larger number of participants.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent94 - 99
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectBreast
dc.subjectArm
dc.subjectSkin
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBreast Neoplasms
dc.subjectLymphedema
dc.subjectAnisotropy
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealthy Volunteers
dc.titleInvestigation of In Vivo skin stiffness anisotropy in breast cancer related lymphoedema.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-21
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.11.043
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-01
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of biomechanics
pubs.issue1
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Ultrasound & Optical Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Ultrasound & Optical Imaging
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume49
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamUltrasound & Optical Imagingen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorBamber, Jeffreyen


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