Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSteitz, J
dc.contributor.authorNaumann, P
dc.contributor.authorUlrich, S
dc.contributor.authorHaefner, MF
dc.contributor.authorSterzing, F
dc.contributor.authorOelfke, U
dc.contributor.authorBangert, M
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-19T16:10:22Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-07
dc.identifier.citationRadiation oncology (London, England), 2016, 11 (1), pp. 134 - ?
dc.identifier.issn1748-717X
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/175
dc.identifier.eissn1748-717X
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13014-016-0705-8
dc.description.abstractIntroduction The efficacy of radiation therapy treatments for pancreatic cancer is compromised by abdominal motion which limits the spatial accuracy for dose delivery - especially for particles. In this work we investigate the potential of worst case optimization for interfractional offline motion mitigation in carbon ion treatments of pancreatic cancer.Methods We implement a worst case optimization algorithm that explicitly models the relative biological effectiveness of carbon ions during inverse planning. We perform a comparative treatment planning study for seven pancreatic cancer patients. Treatment plans that have been generated using worst case optimization are compared against (1) conventional intensity-modulated carbon ion therapy, (2) single field uniform dose carbon ion therapy, and (3) an ideal yet impractical scenario relying on daily re-planning. The dosimetric quality and robustness of the resulting treatment plans is evaluated using reconstructions of the daily delivered dose distributions on fractional control CTs.Results Idealized daily re-planning consistently gives the best dosimetric results with regard to both target coverage and organ at risk sparing. The absolute reduction of D 95 within the gross tumor volume during fractional dose reconstruction is most pronounced for conventional intensity-modulated carbon ion therapy. Single field uniform dose optimization exhibits no substantial reduction for six of seven patients and values for D 95 for worst case optimization fall in between. The treated volume (D>95 % prescription dose) outside of the gross tumor volume is reduced by a factor of two by worst case optimization compared to conventional optimization and single field uniform dose optimization. Single field uniform dose optimization comes at an increased radiation exposure of normal tissues, e.g. ≈2 Gy (RBE) in the mean dose in the kidneys compared to conventional and worst case optimization and ≈4 Gy (RBE) in D 1 in the spinal cord compared to worst case optimization.Conclusion Interfractional motion substantially deteriorates dose distributions for carbon ion treatments of pancreatic cancer patients. Single field uniform dose optimization mitigates the negative influence of motion on target coverage at an increased radiation exposure of normal tissue. Worst case optimization enables an exploration of the trade-off between robust target coverage and organ at risk sparing during inverse treatment planning beyond margin concepts.
dc.formatElectronic
dc.format.extent134 - ?
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPancreatic Neoplasms
dc.subjectIons
dc.subjectCarbon
dc.subjectRadiotherapy Dosage
dc.subjectRadiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectRadiometry
dc.subjectRelative Biological Effectiveness
dc.subjectAlgorithms
dc.subjectMotion
dc.subjectHeavy Ion Radiotherapy
dc.subjectDose Fractionation, Radiation
dc.titleWorst case optimization for interfractional motion mitigation in carbon ion therapy of pancreatic cancer.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-09-20
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s13014-016-0705-8
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-10-07
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfRadiation oncology (London, England)
pubs.issue1
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Radiotherapy Physics Modelling
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Radiotherapy Physics Modelling
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume11
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamRadiotherapy Physics Modellingen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorOelfke, Uween


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0