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dc.contributor.authorJones, ME
dc.contributor.authorSchoemaker, MJ
dc.contributor.authorMcFadden, EC
dc.contributor.authorWright, LB
dc.contributor.authorJohns, LE
dc.contributor.authorSwerdlow, AJ
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-19T15:08:59Z
dc.date.issued2019-07
dc.identifier.citationBritish journal of cancer, 2019, 121 (2), pp. 172 - 179
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/3260
dc.identifier.eissn1532-1827
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41416-019-0485-7
dc.description.abstractBackground It is plausible that night shift work could affect breast cancer risk, possibly by melatonin suppression or circadian clock disruption, but epidemiological evidence is inconclusive.Methods Using serial questionnaires from the Generations Study cohort, we estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for breast cancer in relation to being a night shift worker within the last 10 years, adjusted for potential confounders.Results Among 102,869 women recruited in 2003-2014, median follow-up 9.5 years, 2059 developed invasive breast cancer. The HR in relation to night shift work was 1.00 (95%CI: 0.86-1.15). There was a significant trend with average hours of night work per week (P = 0.035), but no significantly raised risks for hours worked per night, nights worked per week, average hours worked per week, cumulative years of employment, cumulative hours, time since cessation, type of occupation, age starting night shift work, or age starting in relation to first pregnancy.Conclusions The lack of overall association, and no association with all but one measure of dose, duration, and intensity in our data, does not support an increased risk of breast cancer from night shift work in women.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent172 - 179
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBreast Neoplasms
dc.subjectReceptor, erbB-2
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectShift Work Schedule
dc.titleNight shift work and risk of breast cancer in women: the Generations Study cohort.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-05-02
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41416-019-0485-7
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfBritish journal of cancer
pubs.issue2
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research/Aetiological Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology/Aetiological Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research/Aetiological Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology/Aetiological Epidemiology
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume121en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamAetiological Epidemiologyen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorSwerdlow, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.icrauthorSchoemaker, Minouken
dc.contributor.icrauthorJones, Michaelen


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