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dc.contributor.authorPetkar, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorBhide, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorNewbold, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorNutting, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-30T13:40:56Z
dc.date.issued2018-05en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe British journal of radiology, 2018, 91 (1085), pp. 20170590 - ?en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/1663
dc.identifier.eissn1748-880Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/bjr.20170590en_US
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE:Advances in radiation delivery, imaging techniques, and chemotherapy have significantly improved treatment options for non-metastatic nasopharyngeal cancers (NPC). However, their impact on the practice in the United Kingdom (UK), where this tumour is rare, is unknown. This study examined the current attitudes of UK head and neck oncologists to the treatment of NPC. METHODS:UK head and neck oncologists representing 19/23 cancer networks were sent an invitation email with a personalised link to a web-based survey designed to identify the influence of tumour and nodal staging on current NPC management practices. RESULTS:26/42 (61%) of clinicians responded. Induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation was the treatment of choice for Stage III (69%) and IVa/b (96%), with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil combination being the most commonly used induction chemotherapy regimen (88%). 16 centres (61%) used a geometric approach, adding variable margins of 0-10 mm to the gross tumour volume to define their therapeutic dose clinical target volume. 54% of respondents used 3 radiotherapy (RT) prescription doses to treat NPC. Retropharyngeal nodal region irradiation policy was inconsistent, with nearly one-quarter treating the entire group to a radical dose. CONCLUSION:Significant heterogeneity currently exists in the RT practice of NPC in the UK. A consensus regarding the optimal curative, function-sparing treatment paradigm for NPC is necessary to ensure cancer survivors have satisfactory long-term health-related quality of life. Advances in knowledge: This is the first study to highlight the significant variation in RT practice of NPC in the UK.en_US
dc.formatPrint-Electronicen_US
dc.format.extent20170590 - ?en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectHeaden_US
dc.subjectNecken_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectNasopharyngeal Neoplasmsen_US
dc.subjectNeoplasm Stagingen_US
dc.subjectPractice Patterns, Physicians'en_US
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.subjectOncologistsen_US
dc.titlePractice patterns for the radical treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer by head and neck oncologists in the United Kingdom.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1259/bjr.20170590en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-05en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfThe British journal of radiologyen_US
pubs.issue1085en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology/Targeted Therapy
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Targeted Therapy
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume91en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNot knownen_US
icr.researchteamTargeted Therapyen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorHarrington, Kevinen_US


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