Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTargeted Alpha Therapy Working Groupen_US
dc.contributor.authorParker, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewington, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorShore, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorKratochwil, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLindén, Oen_US
dc.contributor.authorNoordzij, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaad, Fen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T11:14:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-01en_US
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30326033en_US
dc.identifier2703121en_US
dc.identifier.citationJAMA Oncol, 2018, 4 (12), pp. 1765 - 1772en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/2948
dc.identifier.eissn2374-2445en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.4044en_US
dc.description.abstractImportance: Targeted alpha therapy attempts to deliver systemic radiation selectively to cancer cells while minimizing systemic toxic effects and may lead to additional treatment options for many cancer types. Observations: Theoretically, the high-energy emission of short-range alpha particles causes complex double-stranded DNA breaks, eliciting cell death. No known resistance mechanism to alpha particles has been reported or scientifically established. The short-range emission of alpha particle radiation confines its cytotoxic effect to cancerous lesions and the surrounding tumor microenvironment while limiting toxic effects to noncancerous tissues. The high level of radiobiological effectiveness of alpha particles, in comparison with beta emissions, requires fewer particle tracks to induce cell death. Clinically effective alpha particle-emitting isotopes for cancer therapy should have a short half-life, which will limit long-term radiation exposure and allow for the production, preparation, and administration of these isotopes for clinical use and application. Radium 223 dichloride is the first-in-class, commercially available targeted alpha therapy approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases. Given the established overall survival benefit conferred by radium 223 for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, several other targeted alpha therapies are being investigated in clinical trials across many tumor types. Conclusions and Relevance: Targeted alpha therapy represents an emerging treatment approach and provides for the possibility to bypass mechanisms of acquired resistance in selected tumors. In addition, developing novel radionuclide conjugation strategies may overcome targeting limitations. So far, the clinical success of radium 223 has demonstrated the proof of concept for targeted alpha therapy, and future studies may lead to additional treatment options for many cancer types.en_US
dc.format.extent1765 - 1772en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden_US
dc.titleTargeted Alpha Therapy, an Emerging Class of Cancer Agents: A Review.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.4044en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-12-01en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfJAMA Oncolen_US
pubs.issue12en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume4en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNot knownen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorParker, Chrisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record