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dc.contributor.authorBancroft, EK
dc.contributor.authorSaya, S
dc.contributor.authorBrown, E
dc.contributor.authorThomas, S
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, N
dc.contributor.authorRothwell, J
dc.contributor.authorPope, J
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, A
dc.contributor.authorPage, E
dc.contributor.authorBenafif, S
dc.contributor.authorHanson, H
dc.contributor.authorDias, A
dc.contributor.authorMikropoulos, C
dc.contributor.authorIzatt, L
dc.contributor.authorSide, L
dc.contributor.authorWalker, L
dc.contributor.authorDonaldson, A
dc.contributor.authorCook, JA
dc.contributor.authorBarwell, J
dc.contributor.authorWiles, V
dc.contributor.authorLimb, L
dc.contributor.authorEccles, DM
dc.contributor.authorLeach, MO
dc.contributor.authorShanley, S
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, FJ
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, D
dc.contributor.authorRajashanker, B
dc.contributor.authorWhitehouse, RW
dc.contributor.authorKoh, D-M
dc.contributor.authorSohaib, SA
dc.contributor.authorEvans, DG
dc.contributor.authorEeles, RA
dc.contributor.authorWalker, LG
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-18T14:24:39Z
dc.date.issued2020-04
dc.identifier.citationJournal of medical genetics, 2020, 57 (4), pp. 226 - 236
dc.identifier.issn0022-2593
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/3425
dc.identifier.eissn1468-6244
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106407
dc.description.abstractBackground Germline TP53 gene pathogenic variants (pv) cause a very high lifetime risk of developing cancer, almost 100% for women and 75% for men. In the UK, annual MRI breast screening is recommended for female TP53 pv carriers. The SIGNIFY study (Magnetic Resonance Imaging screening in Li Fraumeni syndrome: An exploratory whole body MRI) study reported outcomes of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) in a cohort of 44 TP53 pv carriers and 44 matched population controls. The results supported the use of a baseline WB-MRI screen in all adult TP53 pv carriers. Here we report the acceptability of WB-MRI screening and effects on psychosocial functioning and health-related quality of life in the short and medium terms.Methods Psychosocial and other assessments were carried out at study enrolment, immediately before MRI, before and after MRI results, and at 12, 26 and 52 weeks' follow-up.Results WB-MRI was found to be acceptable with high levels of satisfaction and low levels of psychological morbidity throughout. Although their mean levels of cancer worry were not high, carriers had significantly more cancer worry at most time-points than controls. They also reported significantly more clinically significant intrusive and avoidant thoughts about cancer than controls at all time-points. There were no clinically significant adverse psychosocial outcomes in either carriers with a history of cancer or in those requiring further investigations.Conclusion WB-MRI screening can be implemented in TP53 pv carriers without adverse psychosocial outcomes in the short and medium terms. A previous cancer diagnosis may predict a better psychosocial outcome. Some carriers seriously underestimate their risk of cancer. Carriers of pv should have access to a clinician to help them develop adaptive strategies to cope with cancer-related concerns and respond to clinically significant depression and/or anxiety.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent226 - 236
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titlePsychosocial effects of whole-body MRI screening in adult high-risk pathogenic <i>TP53</i> mutation carriers: a case-controlled study (SIGNIFY).
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-21
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106407
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-04
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of medical genetics
pubs.issue4
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume57
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamOncogeneticsen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorEeles, Rosalinden
dc.contributor.icrauthorKoh, Dow-Muen


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