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dc.contributor.authorBerner, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHughes, DJen_US
dc.contributor.authorTharmalingam, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorHeyworth, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-18T14:24:59Z
dc.date.issued2020-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationESMO open, 2020, 5 (6)en_US
dc.identifier.issn2059-7029en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/4293
dc.identifier.eissn2059-7029en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/esmoopen-2020-000906en_US
dc.description.abstract<h4>Introduction</h4>Over one million people in the UK identify as LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning). Research has shown that this population experience differing cancer risk factors compared with non-LGBTQ+ patients and persistent inequalities in cancer care. Literature concerning the knowledge of oncologists of this group's healthcare needs is limited; our study aimed to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of UK oncologists about LGBTQ+ patients.<h4>Methods</h4>A 53-question survey was delivered via a secure online platform. Questions covered respondent demographics, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours with the majority of responses on a Likert scale. Oncologists were recruited via email from professional bodies and social media promotion. Informed consent was sought and responses fully anonymised. Multifactorial ordinal logistic regression and Fisher's exact test were used to assess for interactions between demographics and responses with Holm-Bonferroni multiple testing correction.<h4>Results</h4>258 fully completed responses were received. Respondents had a median age of 43 years (range 28-69); 65% consultants and 35% registrars; 42% medical, and 54% clinical, oncologists. 84% felt comfortable treating LGBTQ+ patients but only 8% agreed that they were confident in their knowledge of specific LGBTQ+ patient healthcare needs. There were low rates of routine enquiry about sexual orientation (5%), gender identity (3%) and preferred pronouns (2%). 68% of oncologists felt LGBTQ+ healthcare needs should be a mandatory component of postgraduate training.<h4>Conclusions</h4>This survey showed that UK oncologists feel comfortable treating LGBTQ+ patients but may fail to identify these patients in their clinic, making it more difficult to meet LGBTQ+ healthcare needs. There is self-awareness of deficits in knowledge of LGBTQ+ healthcare and a willingness to address this through postgraduate training. Educational resources collated and developed in accordance with this study would potentially improve the confidence of oncologists in treating LGBTQ+ patients and the cancer care these patients receive.en_US
dc.formatPrinten_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.titleAn evaluation of self-perceived knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of UK oncologists about LGBTQ+ patients with cancer.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-10-07en_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/esmoopen-2020-000906en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-11en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfESMO openen_US
pubs.issue6en_US
pubs.notesNo embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/Royal Marsden Clinical Units
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume5en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNo embargoen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorBanerjee, Susanaen_US


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