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dc.contributor.authorSounderajah, V
dc.contributor.authorClarke, J
dc.contributor.authorYalamanchili, S
dc.contributor.authorAcharya, A
dc.contributor.authorMarkar, SR
dc.contributor.authorAshrafian, H
dc.contributor.authorDarzi, A
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T09:15:57Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T09:15:57Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-16
dc.identifier.citationScientific reports, 2021, 11 (1), pp. 5958 - ?
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/4602
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-021-85514-w
dc.description.abstractThere is concern that digital public health initiatives used in the management of COVID-19 may marginalise certain population groups. There is an overlap between the demographics of groups at risk of digital exclusion (older, lower social grade, low educational attainment and ethnic minorities) and those who are vulnerable to poorer health outcomes from SARS-CoV-2. In this national survey study (n = 2040), we assessed how the UK population; particularly these overlapping groups, reported their preparedness for digital health strategies. We report, with respect to using digital information to make health decisions, that those over 60 are less comfortable (net comfort: 57%) than those between 18 and 39 (net comfort: 78%) and lower social grades are less comfortable (net comfort: 63%) than higher social grades (net comfort: 75%). With respect to a preference for digital over non-digital sources in seeking COVID-19 health information, those over 60 (net preference: 21%) are less inclined than those between 18 and 39 (net preference: 60%) and those of low educational attainment (net preference: 30%) are less inclined than those of high educational attainment (net preference: 52%). Lastly, with respect to distinguishing reliable digital COVID-19 information, lower social grades (net confidence: 55%) are less confident than higher social grades (net confidence: 68%) and those of low educational attainment (net confidence: 51%) are less confident than those of high educational attainment (net confidence: 71%). All reported differences are statistically significant (p < 0.01) following multivariate regression modelling. This study suggests that digital public health approaches to COVID-19 have the potential to marginalise groups who are concurrently at risk of digital exclusion and poor health outcomes from SARS-CoV-2.
dc.formatElectronic
dc.format.extent5958 - ?
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHealth Surveys
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectTelemedicine
dc.subjectSocial Class
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectEthnic Groups
dc.subjectEducational Status
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2
dc.titleA national survey assessing public readiness for digital health strategies against COVID-19 within the United Kingdom.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-03-01
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41598-021-85514-w
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-03-16
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfScientific reports
pubs.issue1
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume11en_US
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
dc.contributor.icrauthorDarzi, Araen


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