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dc.contributor.authorLophatananon, A
dc.contributor.authorStewart-Brown, S
dc.contributor.authorKote-Jarai, Z
dc.contributor.authorOlama, AAA
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, SB
dc.contributor.authorNeal, DE
dc.contributor.authorHamdy, FC
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, JL
dc.contributor.authorGiles, GG
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, LM
dc.contributor.authorSouthey, MC
dc.contributor.authorPharoah, P
dc.contributor.authorPashayan, N
dc.contributor.authorGronberg, H
dc.contributor.authorWiklund, F
dc.contributor.authorAly, M
dc.contributor.authorStanford, JL
dc.contributor.authorBrenner, H
dc.contributor.authorDieffenbach, AK
dc.contributor.authorArndt, V
dc.contributor.authorPark, JY
dc.contributor.authorLin, H-Y
dc.contributor.authorSellers, T
dc.contributor.authorSlavov, C
dc.contributor.authorKaneva, R
dc.contributor.authorMitev, V
dc.contributor.authorBatra, J
dc.contributor.authorSpurdle, A
dc.contributor.authorClements, JA
dc.contributor.authorAPCB BioResource
dc.contributor.authorPRACTICAL consortium
dc.contributor.authorEaston, D
dc.contributor.authorEeles, RA
dc.contributor.authorMuir, K
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-01T16:02:11Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.citationBritish journal of cancer, 2017, 117 (5), pp. 734 - 743
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/894
dc.identifier.eissn1532-1827
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/bjc.2017.231
dc.description.abstractBackground Evidence on height and prostate cancer risk is mixed, however, recent studies with large data sets support a possible role for its association with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.Methods We analysed data from the PRACTICAL consortium consisting of 6207 prostate cancer cases and 6016 controls and a subset of high grade cases (2480 cases). We explored height, polymorphisms in genes related to growth processes as main effects and their possible interactions.Results The results suggest that height is associated with high-grade prostate cancer risk. Men with height >180 cm are at a 22% increased risk as compared to men with height <173 cm (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.48). Genetic variants in the growth pathway gene showed an association with prostate cancer risk. The aggregate scores of the selected variants identified a significantly increased risk of overall prostate cancer and high-grade prostate cancer by 13% and 15%, respectively, in the highest score group as compared to lowest score group.Conclusions There was no evidence of gene-environment interaction between height and the selected candidate SNPs.Our findings suggest a role of height in high-grade prostate cancer. The effect of genetic variants in the genes related to growth is seen in all cases and high-grade prostate cancer. There is no interaction between these two exposures.
dc.formatPrint-Electronic
dc.format.extent734 - 743
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectAPCB BioResource
dc.subjectPRACTICAL consortium
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectProstatic Neoplasms
dc.subjectBody Height
dc.subjectRisk Assessment
dc.subjectCase-Control Studies
dc.subjectPolymorphism, Single Nucleotide
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectNeoplasm Grading
dc.subjectGene-Environment Interaction
dc.titleHeight, selected genetic markers and prostate cancer risk: results from the PRACTICAL consortium.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-06-23
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/bjc.2017.231
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfBritish journal of cancer
pubs.issue5
pubs.notesNot known
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Students
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Students/PhD and MPhil
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Students/PhD and MPhil/18/19 Starting Cohort
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Oncogenetics
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Students
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Students/PhD and MPhil
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Students/PhD and MPhil/18/19 Starting Cohort
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume117
pubs.embargo.termsNot known
icr.researchteamOncogeneticsen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorEeles, Rosalinden
dc.contributor.icrauthorKote-Jarai, Zsofiaen
dc.contributor.icrauthorSaunders, Edwarden


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