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dc.contributor.authorSmrke, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorYounger, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorHusson, Oen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarag, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorMerry, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMacklin-Doherty, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorCojocaru, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorArthur, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorBenson, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiah, ABen_US
dc.contributor.authorZaidi, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorGennatas, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, RLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-15T14:58:05Z
dc.date.issued2020-07
dc.identifier.citationJCO global oncology, 2020, 6 pp. 1046 - 1051
dc.identifier.issn2687-8941
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/3846
dc.identifier.eissn2687-8941
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/go.20.00220
dc.description.abstractPurpose Many patients with cancer, often those with rare cancers such as sarcomas, travel long distances to access expert care. The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated widespread changes in delivery of cancer care, including rapid adoption of telemedicine-based care. We aimed to evaluate the impact of telemedicine on patients, clinicians, and care delivery at the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) Sarcoma Unit during the pandemic. Methods Data were extracted from patient records for all planned outpatient appointments at the RMH Sarcoma Unit from March 23 to April 24, 2020. Patients and clinicians completed separate questionnaires to understand their experiences. Results Of 379 planned face-to-face appointments, 283 (75%) were converted to telemedicine. Face-to-face appointments remained for patients who needed urgent start of therapy or performance status assessment. Patients lived on average > 1.5 hours from RMH. Patient satisfaction (n = 108) with telemedicine was high (mean, 9/10), and only 48% (n = 52/108) would not want to hear bad news using telemedicine. Clinicians found telemedicine efficient, with no associated increased workload, compared with face-to-face appointments. Clinicians indicated lack of physical examination did not often affect care provision when using telemedicine. Most clinicians (n = 17; 94%) believed telemedicine use was practice changing; congruently, 80% (n = 86/108) of patients desired some telemedicine as part of their future care, citing reduced cost and travel time. Conclusion Telemedicine can revolutionize delivery of cancer care, particularly for patients with rare cancers who often live far away from expert centers. Our study demonstrates important patient and clinician benefits; assessment of longer-term impact on patient outcomes and health care systems is needed.
dc.formatPrint
dc.format.extent1046 - 1051
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPneumonia, Viral
dc.subjectCoronavirus Infections
dc.subjectSarcoma
dc.subjectGastrointestinal Neoplasms
dc.subjectSoft Tissue Neoplasms
dc.subjectGastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
dc.subjectAmbulatory Care
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectMedical Oncology
dc.subjectTelemedicine
dc.subjectTravel
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectWorkload
dc.subjectPatient Satisfaction
dc.subjectDelivery of Health Care
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectPandemics
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom
dc.subjectBetacoronavirus
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2
dc.titleTelemedicine During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Impact on Care for Rare Cancers.
dc.typeJournal Article
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1200/go.20.00220
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.relation.isPartOfJCO global oncology
pubs.notesNo embargo
pubs.organisational-group/ICR
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Breast Cancer Research/Aetiological Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Cancer Biology/Targeted Therapy
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Clinical Studies/Clinical and Translational Sarcoma
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Genetics and Epidemiology/Aetiological Epidemiology
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging
pubs.organisational-group/ICR/Primary Group/ICR Divisions/Radiotherapy and Imaging/Targeted Therapy
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume6
pubs.embargo.termsNo embargo
icr.researchteamClinical and Translational Sarcomaen_US
icr.researchteamAetiological Epidemiologyen_US
icr.researchteamTargeted Therapyen_US
dc.contributor.icrauthorZaidi, Shane Haideren
dc.contributor.icrauthorMacklin-Doherty, Aislinnen
dc.contributor.icrauthorHusson, Olgaen


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